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ALSBERG AMERICAN GUIDE SERIES ILLUSTRATED Sponsored by the University of New Mexico HASTINGS HOUSE Publishers NEW YORK MCMLXII FIRST PUBLISHED IN AUGUST 1940 SECOND PRINTING IN JUNE 1945 THIRD PRINTING IN SEPTEMBER 1947 REVISED EDITION NOVEMBER 1953 NEW, COMPLETELY REVISED EDITION, AUGUST 1962 CORONADO CUARTO CENTENNIAL COMMISSION State-wide Sponsor of the New Mexico Writers' Project FEDERAL WORKS AGENCY JOHN M. HARRINGTON, Commissioner FLORENCE KERR, Assistant Commissioner JAMES J.

CARMODY, Administrator WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION F. CONNELLY, State Administrator COPYRIGHT 1953, 1962 BY HASTINGS HOUSE PUBLISHERS, INC.

The story of the exploration, colonization, and slow development of this vast area, fourth largest of the states, is most fascinating.

Captains of industry are at best second lieutenants in New Mexico; the land's the thing!

The numerous reclamation projects already com- pleted and in operation, have advanced the State's agricultural position, and the huge Navajo Dam, now under construction near Farmington, when completed will bring additional economic benefits to New Mexico.

The State might be called the center of the atomic phenomena with its Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, conducted by the University of California, where the first atomic bomb was produced, and "Trinity Site," in the White Sands Proving Grounds area, where the first atomic bomb was exploded in 1945, The economic life of many of New Mexico's Indians has also been im- proved, with their participation in these scientific and industrial fields, and especially the Navaho, largest tribe in the United States, whose royalties of upwards of million in oil leases in the Four Corners area of their reser- vation, has enabled them to improve in many ways their physical and cultural lot in life.

Albuquerque, the State's largest city, has expanded rapidly in area as well as population growth, the latter having more than doubled in the last decade to over 201,000 in 1960, with an additional 40,000 on the city's fringe area. Gratitude for valuable aid is due the University of New Mexico, New Mexico State University, the Department of Development and the State Tourist Bureau, State Highway Department, government agencies, officers in charge of the various national and state parks and monuments, chambers of commerce, postmasters, and other individuals, through whose co-operation this revision has been made possible.

The population figures used in this revision are, for the most part, from the 1960 official U. Special thanks is extended to the New Mexico Tourist Division for the new photographs illustrating this volume.

If the file has been modified from its original state, some details such as the timestamp may not fully reflect those of the original file.The Navaho tend their flocks by day and dance to the weird Mountain Chant by night. v VI FOREWORD This volume, sponsored jointly by the University of New Mexico and the Coronado Cuarto Centennial Commission, tells, and tempts you to look. ANDERSON Managing Director United States Coronado Exposition Commission FOREWORD TO THE COMPLETELY REVISED EDITION New Mexico has enjoyed phenomenal growth, and has changed greatly in many of its phases since this volume was last revised in 1953.That you may find and follow these roads, that you may see how life was lived in this sun-baked land before the first Pilgrim braved the cold winters of New England, that you may compare for yourself the cultures of Indian, Spaniard, or Anglo-American or may see them fused into one pleasant pattern of living, this Guide to New Mexico is offered. While many of the towns have remained practically as they were, the explosive de- velopment of the uranium, oil, and natural gas fields together with vast missile and allied 'programs, has brought about a shift in the population to these accelerated areas.The Indian, in his pueblo, still carries on the religious ceremonies of his ancestors, while in the village nearby the descendants of the Spanish and Mexican conquerors swirl rhythmically to the strains of folk songs long since brought from old Spain and Mexico.To the beat of the Indian tom-tom and the gay rhythms of the Spanish dance, there is added the roar of the air transport and the sweep of the transcontinental stream- lined train.

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JOSEPH MILLER Preface New Mexico is so rich in material of various kinds that it is well- nigh impossible to do more than point out, in a book of this size, what its treasures are and where they can be found.

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